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New short courses address sustainability in dairy and food industries

Two new short courses are available to members of the dairy and food industries interested in sustainability. The Dairy and Food Plant Wastewater Short Course runs Nov. 9-10, followed by the Carbon Accounting for Dairy and Food Plant Manufacturing Short Course Nov. 10-11.

For more information, read the course announcements below or contact Franco Milani at (608) 890-2640 or milani@wisc.edu.

Dairy and Food Plant Wastewater Short Course

Cheesemakers, meat and food processors, production supervisors, plant engineers, and quality control personnel are invited to attend the Dairy and Food Plant Wastewater Short Course at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Nov. 9 and 10.

The two day course is designed to deal with issues of water usage in dairy and food plants and environmental issues involving wastes coming from dairy and food processing plants. The first day of the course will begin with wastewater monitoring, sampling and environmental regulations. The second day will concentrate on methods of pretreatment and biological treatment of dairy and food plant wastewater. We have added a field trip tour of a renewable energy facility as an optional activity for the afternoon of the second day.

Speakers include Franco Milani, Bill Wendorff, and Steve Ingham from the University of Wisconsin; Glenn Goldschmidt from the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection; Rich Reichardt and Fred Hegeman from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources; John Kouba of Kouba Engineering LLC; Todd Hutson of Filtration Engineering LLC; Kevin O’Leary of Nalco Co; and Tom and Henry Probst of the Probst Group LLC.

Upon completion of the course, certified wastewater treatment plant operators will earn ten continuing education credits for wastewater. The course also qualifies as an elective for the Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker Program.

See the brochure and Register online at http://www.cdr.wisc.edu/shortcourses/wastewater.html

The course, which starts with registration at 8 a.m. and program at 8:25 a.m., is located in Babcock Hall, 1605 Linden Drive, on the campus of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. It is sponsored by the Department of Food Science, The Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research, and USDA Rural Development.

The course fee is $300 and the optional bus trip costs $45. Course materials, break refreshments and box lunches are included. Hotel accommodations are available for participants to seek on their own at the InnTowner or the Madison Concourse Hotel. Blocks of rooms are held until Oct. 12.

Carbon Accounting for Dairy and Food Plant Manufacturing Short Course

A new and timely short course will teach dairy and food plant manufacturers about carbon accounting. Cheesemakers, meat and food processors, production supervisors, plant engineers, marketing managers, food plant owners, and public and private regulatory personnel are invited to attend the Carbon Accounting for Dairy and Food Plant Manufacturing Short Course at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Nov. 10 and 11. The course starts with an optional half day field trip to a renewable energy facility Nov. 10 and continues for another day of lectures and discussion Nov. 11.

The course is designed to deal with issues of climate change and air borne waste with dairy and food processing plants. The course begins with air emission monitoring, sampling, and current environmental regulations. A discussion of creating, marketing, and selling carbon offsets will follow. Participants will also learn about the methods of life cycle assessment. A field trip tour of a renewable energy facility is an optional activity for the afternoon of the first day.

“We decided we wanted a short course that was directed to industrial managers who want to be conversant in air-related regulations, life cycle assessment methods, and hearing from people who are installing alternative energy systems,” says Franco Milani, assistant professor of Food Science. “We also put the pieces of the puzzle together from the inherent multi-organizational dealings such as process certification, carbon trading, and ownership. Carbon is a commodity now and there are people who want to buy it. Even small food processing plants can benefit just by realizing best practices in saving and selling carbon,” he adds.

Speakers include Franco Milani, Tracey Holloway, and Doug Reinemann from the University of Wisconsin; Joseph Hoch from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources; Todd Palmer from DeWitt, Ross, & Stevens SC; and Jonathan Stack from Cantor CO2e.

See the brochure and register online at http://www.cdr.wisc.edu/shortcourses/carbon_accounting.html

The course is located in Babcock Hall, 1605 Linden Drive, on the campus of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. It is sponsored by the Department of Food Science, Department of Biological Systems Engineering, The Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research, and USDA Rural Development.

The course fee is $180 and the optional bus trip costs $45. Course materials, break refreshments, and box lunches are included. Hotel accommodations are available for participants to seek on their own at the InnTowner or the Madison Concourse Hotel. Blocks of rooms are held until Oct. 12.

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