UW scientists, students give a boost to science education in local schools

Genetics professor Audrey Gasch loves questions. It’s her job as a scientist to ask questions and then go seek answers. But it’s also her passion to help others ask questions, including some of Madison’s youngest future scientists. Gasch joined the …

Green Therapy: Redesigning landscapes to heal body and soul – drawing on CALS expertise

The teens in the rehab program can’t have drugs, so they use the waterfall instead. That’s how Lily Mank BSLA’15 explains the fact that when patients first visit the healing garden at the Rosecrance Griffin Williamson adolescent substance abuse facility …

Beyond genes: Protein atlas scores nitrogen fixing duet

Of the many elusive grails of agricultural biotechnology, the ability to confer nitrogen fixation into non-leguminous plants such as cereals ranks near the very top. Doing so is a huge challenge because legumes partner with bacteria called rhizobia in a …

Forest ecology class uses Buckthorn Baggies to eliminate troublesome trees

Buckthorn is a troublesome, invasive tree that forms dense thickets and crowds other plants. When it’s cut down, it springs back and sends out many offshoots. Autumn Sabo, an instructor for a forest ecology class led by Phil Townsend, knows about the troublesome …

Continuing a legacy: Vitamin D research in the 21st century

The legacy of vitamin D research in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin–Madison runs deep — almost as deep as the vitamin’s involvement in a multitude of important processes in the body, such as bone health, muscle …

Natural leader: LSC student Sarah Krier develops “Little Aldos” program for kids

Growing up, Sarah Krier was fascinated by the outdoors. On a typical day she would be outside exploring, picking up bugs, and returning home muddy. These early experiences would set the foundation for her studies at UW-Madison—where she is double …

How rattlesnakes got, and lost, their venom

Millions of years ago, as the snake family tree grew new branches, the ancestor of modern rattlesnakes was endowed with a genetic arsenal of toxic weaponry, including genes for toxins that poison the blood, toxins that damage muscle and toxins …