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UW-Madison assesses position to support National Microbiome Initiative

In this scanning electron microscope image, the bacteria (Acetobacter xylinum) is producing cellulose nanofibers, which are incredibly strong for how light they are. Engineers use the nanofibers to create materials that have a wide range of uses, from strong composites to tissue engineering. Image by Thomas Ellingham, UW-Madison mechanical engineering graduate student.
In this scanning electron microscope image, the bacteria (Acetobacter xylinum) is producing cellulose nanofibers, which are incredibly strong for how light they are. Engineers use the nanofibers to create materials that have a wide range of uses, from strong composites to tissue engineering. Image by Thomas Ellingham, UW-Madison mechanical engineering graduate student.

A recent UW-Madison news story explores how the university is positioned to support the federal government’s new National Microbiome Initiative (NMI), which was launched earlier this year to “foster the integrated study of microbiomes across different ecosystems.”

The article highlights several CALS people working on microbiome research, including a number who attended the Initiative’s launch event at the White House on May 13.

This national effort synergizes nicely with the efforts of the CALS Microbiome Workgroup, a special initiative that grew out of the college’s strategic plan, which is working to build research partnerships in this area of science across the university. This past spring, the workgroup hosted a symposium titled “Exploring Microbiome Opportunities in Life Sciences and Agriculture” that was very well attended and is expected to yield new collaborations.

Read the recent UW-Madison story here: http://news.wisc.edu/uw-madison-seeks-to-capitalize-on-push-to-harness-helpful-microbes/.

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