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3rd Annual Oliver Smithies Symposium – May 20

Save  May 20 for the 3rd Annual Oliver Smithies Symposium, to be held in the Ebling Symposium Center Room,  1220 Microbial Sciences Building. This Symposium is made possible by a gift from Dr. Oliver Smithies. In 2007 Oliver Smithies shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for his discoveries that led, among other things, to the possibility of knockout mice. These studies were made while he served on the faculty here at the University of Wisconsin. Oliver has always been interested in exposing students to the thought processes, approaches and discipline of visionary scientists, feeling that this important aspect of becoming a true scientist can easily be lost in the enormous detail that students must be exposed to in their early careers. Our aim is to provide a forum that will bring speakers of deep accomplishment who focus on communicating their insights into how great discoveries come about.

Speakers include:
Dr. Marshall W. Nirenberg, Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute-NIH
Bethesda, MD (http://dir.nhlbi.nih.gov/labs/lbg) . Dr. Nirenberg was a 1968 Nobel Prize winner in Medicine for his contributions to the interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis.

Dr. Gerald R. Fink, Professor of Genetics, Founding Member of the Whitehead Institute, MIT (http://www.wi.mit.edu/research/faculty/fink.html). Dr. Fink was a pioneer in the field of yeast molecular biology and in the utilization of Arabidopsis thaliana as a model organism for researching plant development.

Dr. M. S. Swaminathan, M S Swaminathan Research Foundation, Chennai, India (http://www.mssrf.org/), Dr. Swaminathan is known as the “Father of the Green Revolution in India”. His vision is to rid the world of hunger and poverty. His many contributions to agriculture research and the conservation of natural resources have been felt worldwide.

This symposium is free and open to the public.

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