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AID (HED TIES) grants for linkage with Mexican universities deadline March 23

Applications are being sought for the The Training, Internships, Exchanges, and Scholarships (TIES) Initiative Phase III. The program plans to offer six awards of up to $250,000 each, incrementally funded over a two-year period, contingent on USAID funding.

The focus is on MS scholarships for Mexicans to come here. CALS has one of these grants. Contact Ken Shapiro kshapiro@cals.wisc.edu) or Sharon Baumgartner (sbaumgartner@cals.wisc.edu) for information about that grant.

For details, see the website: www.hedprogram.org/tabid/212/itemid/64/Request-for-Applications-RFA-TIES-Phase-III.aspx

Mexican partners will be eligible to apply for additional scholarship support from CONACyT through its becas mixtas program.

Please note that applications must be submitted by the U.S. partner. Click here for eligibility information. Applications must address the following focus areas (Please see the detailed description of the focus areas for TIES Phase III):

  • Competitiveness
  • High Value Added Products & Advanced Manufacturing Processes for Small & Medium Enterprises
  • Energy
  • Education
  • Public Policy
  • Health

Applications must demonstrate the following:

  • training to build capacity in eligible focus areas (see above), as identified by the Mexican institution and local stakeholders;
  • the graduate program of a Mexican institutional partner is designated as a National Programs of Excellence or Programas Nacionales de Calidad (PFPN). Click here for a list of PFPN programs by institution.
  • a plan that includes a minimum of five long-term graduate-level scholarships for Mexicans, funded by award or cost share funds and a strategy to incorporate additional scholarship support from CONACyT’s becas mixtas program. (Mexican partners will be eligible to apply for up to four becas mixtas per year. Becas Mixtas may cover health insurance, travel, and living expenses–tuition costs are not covered) (link to becas mixtas description);
  • a fair and transparent process for selecting appropriate trainees, including Mexican nationals primarily residing in rural, poor areas of Mexico and/or of indigenous descent, with approximately half of the training opportunities and scholarships offered to women;
  • joint oversight provided by partner institutions;
  • plans for the trainees to return to work in Mexico within a defined timeframe and to an established setting with follow-on support and monitoring from the partner relationship;
  • private sector, NGO, and local government engagement in the partnership; and
  • clear sustainability plans with possible replication and expansion details.

Possible Activities of TIES Partnerships

Possible components of institutional partnerships supported by the TIES initiative may include, but are not limited to:

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  • Graduate-level training in the United States for Mexicans (master, doctoral, post doctoral);*
  • Graduate-level training in Mexico with U.S. faculty or via distance education for Mexicans(master, doctoral, post doctoral);*
  • Dual degree programs for Mexicans with training in the United States or in Mexico;*
  • Specialty training and sabbaticals in the United States for Mexican faculty;*
  • Short-term training (workshops, seminars, professional training) in the United States and short-term training in Mexico for Mexicans;
  • Internships in the private and public sectors, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), or research institutions in either country for Mexicans;
  • Follow-on training in either country for Mexicans;
  • Student research and/or student exchanges (with USAID support for Mexican nationals only);
  • Joint faculty research and/or faculty exchanges;
  • Coordination, technical meetings, observation trips in the United States and Mexico;
  • Innovative use of technology and distance education;
  • Public and private collaboration (including foundations);
  • Collaborative community level outreach and replication projects in Mexico;
  • Joint publications, media events;
  • English language training, as needed; and
  • Workforce development training

* Indicates program components in which scholarships can be proposed to count towards the total number of scholarships supported (may or may not count toward a degree)

Mexican Partners

USAID/Mexico encourages:

  • alliances with diverse partners, including government, NGOs, and the private sector;
  • partnerships with Mexican autonomous higher education institutions; and
  • applications from institutions that seek to foster partnerships with Mexican institutions that have not received a previous TIES award. Click here for a listing of the current partners.

Please note that applications must be submitted by the U.S. partner. Click here for eligibility information.

Scholarship Criteria

Applicant institutions should propose five (5) or more long-term graduate-level scholarships for Mexicans (leading to a degree, as appropriate) to be embedded within a partnership in addition to other training, internships, and exchanges within the application budget. These scholarship expenses may be covered by core award or cost share funds. Mexican partners will be eligible to apply for additional CONACyT scholarship support, beyond the minimum of five, directly from CONACyT, contingent on the availability of funds. Click here for more information about how the Mexican institution may apply for CONACyT scholarships.

Scholarships are tallied in units of two graduate-level academic semesters completed by a single participant; no half scholarships may be counted. (N.B.: An individual who studies three (3) academic semesters is counted as one (1) scholarship; if an individual completes four (4) academic semesters, it is counted as two (2) scholarships, etc.)

Internships that are for academic credit may be counted toward scholarships, and summer sessions, that are equivalent to a semester at the institution where they are undertaken, may be counted toward scholarships.

Applicants should outline a fair and transparent process for selecting appropriate trainees – including Mexican nationals primarily residing in rural, poor areas of Mexico and/or of indigenous descent – with approximately half of the training opportunities and scholarships offered to women.

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