Student opportunities

Lace up your running shoes: Inaugural Graduate School Degree Dash set for Sept. 2

Graduate students, faculty, staff and their families are encouraged to participate in the inaugural Graduate School Degree Dash. The race aims to welcome new and returning graduate students to campus and foster community among graduate education colleagues. Graduate School Degree Dash Date: Friday, September 2, 2016 Location: Bascom Hill. Look for Graduate School banners. Time: Check-in opens at 7:30am. Doctoral Derby (5.7 miles) starts at 8:00am; Master’s Mile (1.75 miles) at 8:30am. For more information and to register, visit: go.wisc.edu/degreedash.
Monday, August 29th, 2016
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student-opportunities
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Lace up your running shoes: Inaugural Graduate School Degree Dash set for Sept. 2
Beyond classroom experiences

Biochem students find passion for science as Undergraduate Summer Research Scholars

Hannah Poe peers into a large microscope in the Hector F. DeLuca Biochemical Sciences Building, seeing not just florescent molecules of RNA, but also a future career in biochemistry research. [caption id="attachment_55440" align="alignleft" width="300"] Biochemistry student Hannah Poe.[/caption] Poe is about to start her last year in the Department of Biochemistry’s undergraduate program, but it will only be her second year on the University of Wisconsin­–Madison campus, as she is a transfer student from a university in Colorado. In addition to her classwork, she became involved in undergraduate research in the department and is currently an undergraduate summer research scholar in Aaron Hoskins’ Lab. “It’s very beneficial to be able to work in the lab without also taking classes like we do during the fall and spring,” Poe says. “The funding from the scholarship has been very helpful for me securing my position in the summer.” The Biochemistry Undergraduate Summer Research Scholarships help undergraduates gain focused, full-time research experience early in their academic careers. In return for a summer stipend, students work in the lab for 30 to 40 hours per week for eight ...
Monday, August 29th, 2016
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beyond-classroom-experiences
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Biochem students find passion for science as Undergraduate Summer Research Scholars
Research

White House OSTP issues call to action to save America’s soil

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy is issuing a national Call to Action and forming an interagency group to protect America’s soil. In issuing this call to action, OSTP seeks innovative actions from Federal agencies, academic scientists and engineers, farmers, entrepreneurs, businesses, advocates, and members of the public in a nationwide effort to impede soil loss, enhance soil genesis, and restore degraded soils. In the United States, estimates are that soil on cultivated cropland is eroding at an average rate of 5.2 tons per acre per year, while the average rate of soil formation falls between 0.008 and 0.51 tons per acre per year. Some parts of the Midwest are losing soil at a much faster rate, especially during extreme weather events—in some regions of the United States, erosion has been measured at over 100 tons per acre in a single storm. That means that a layer of soil that took over 350 years to form was destroyed in a single day. For more information, visit: https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2016/08/01/call-action-save-one-americas-most-important-natural-resources.
Monday, August 29th, 2016
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research
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White House OSTP issues call to action to save America’s soil
Workplace

Want to present at the 2016 UW Wellness Symposium?

The theme for the UW-Madison Wellness Symposium is "Wellness Now: Being Our Best Selves in the Current Moment." We often hear about lifestyle practices to improve our future health and well-being, but caring for ourselves in the midst of our everyday lives can sometimes feel like a struggle. Share information and strategies that support student and/or faculty/staff well-being at the Wellness Symposium on Tuesday, November 15 at Union South! Please consider ways that are applicable to our diverse campus community and are inclusive of all. If you have an idea that you would like to submit for one of the breakout sessions, please complete this form by September 16, 2016. Breakout sessions are either 50 or 110 minutes long.
Monday, August 29th, 2016
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workplace
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Want to present at the 2016 UW Wellness Symposium?
Research

Dairy Strong Sustainability Alliance launches in Wisconsin

Some CALS faculty, staff and graduate students may be interested in the recently-launched Dairy Strong Sustainability Alliance, an alliance that seeks to bring all aspects of dairy sustainability, from farm to table, together to position Wisconsin and the Midwest as a global leader in dairy sustainability. According to a recent news release about the effort, the new Dairy Strong Sustainability Alliance is a collaborative group that represents all aspects of the dairy community: farmers, processors and packagers, conservation groups, vendors and service providers, transporters, consumer packaged goods companies, retailers, government agencies, universities and dairy and trade non-profits. The goal is to show tangible continuous improvements in the areas of land use, soil conservation, nutrient management, water quality and use, energy use, animal welfare, food safety, greenhouse emissions, economic health and social responsibility. For more information, contact Maria Woldt of the Wisconsin Dairy Business Association at mwoldt@widba.com.
Monday, August 29th, 2016
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research
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Dairy Strong Sustainability Alliance launches in Wisconsin
Workplace

UHS campaign to reduce high-risk drinking via bystander intervention

In response to the 2015 Badgers Step Up (BSU)! survey data that indicated gaps in student knowledge on bystander intervention, the Chancellors Advisory Group on Alcohol and Other Drugs is launching a new campaign called “The 3 D’s,” aimed to reduce negative behaviors associated with high-risk drinking through bystander intervention. We ask for your partnership in promoting bystander intervention messaging in your units and social media channels. The campaign aims to teach students different ways to help a friend that has had too much to drink: Be Direct and say something to the person, Distract the person, and Delegate tasks to other people that can help. The campaign uses BSU! data to correct misconceptions about bystander intervention. Below is a sample image from the campaign that will be shared via social media channels and web platforms.
Monday, August 29th, 2016
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workplace
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UHS campaign to reduce high-risk drinking via bystander intervention
Basic Science

Save the Date: Steenbock Symposium on “Protein Trafficking in the Secretory Pathway” set for June 22-25

The Department of Biochemistry and the Department of Biomolecular Chemistry are pleased to invite you to save the date for the 38th Steenbock Symposium on June 22-June 25, 2017. This symposium’s theme, “Protein Trafficking in the Secretory Pathway,” will bring together researchers from across campus and the United States, as well as from Europe and Canada, to discuss and explore this important biochemical process. The symposium will take place on campus in the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery Building. “This topic is researched from many different angles, mine being insulin and diabetes, but since many of the processes are important for multiple cellular functions we can all learn so much from each other at this symposium,” says Alan Attie, a professor of biochemistry and one of the symposium’s organizers. “We seek to bring people together who may not meet each other elsewhere in order to generate new ideas and collaboration.” Along with Attie, biochemistry’s Tom Martin and biomolecular chemistry’s Jon Audhya are also serving as organizers. The Department of Biochemistry is part of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and the Department of Biomolecular ...
Monday, August 29th, 2016
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basic-science
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Save the Date: Steenbock Symposium on “Protein Trafficking in the Secretory Pathway” set for June 22-25
Extension and Outreach

CALS in the News for the Week of Aug 20 – Aug 26

Cheese Surplus: USDA Buys 11 Million Pounds of Cheese To Reduce Market Surplus Wisconsin Public Radio, 8/24 Quoted: Brian Gould, Agricultural & Applied Economics America's Real Mountain Of Cheese Is On Our Plates Wisconsin Public Radio, 8/26 Quoted: Mark Stephenson, Agricultural & Applied Economics Mentioned: Center for Dairy Profitability America's Real Mountain Of Cheese Is On Our Plates National Public Radio, 8/26 Quoted: Mark Stephenson, Agricultural & Applied Economics Mentioned: Center for Dairy Profitability In the News: NPR Swaps Website Commenting For Social Media Wisconsin Public Radio, 8/19 Quoted: Dietram Scheufele, Life Sciences Communication MPS high school cultivates agriculture focus Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 8/20 Quoted: Gail Kraus, Agronomy For graduate students at UW-Madison, sexual harassment sometimes comes from faculty Madison.com, 8/20 Mentioned: Bret Payseur, Genetics For graduate students at UW-Madison, sexual harassment sometimes comes from faculty The Journal Times, 8/20 Mentioned: Bret Payseur, Genetics Arlington Field Day offers tours Agri-View, 8/22 Mentioned: Phil Townsend, Forest & Wildlife Ecology Mentioned: Arlington Agricultural Research Station Last Spooner Sheep Day Aug. 27 Agri-View, 8/22 Mentioned: Dick Vatthauer, Emeritus, Animal Sciences Mentioned: Bob Rand, Emeritus, Plant Pathology Mentioned: Phil Holman, Spooner Agricultural Research Station Mentioned: Alexa Roscizewski, Undergraduate, Animal Sciences Seminars focus on forage management Agri-View, 8/22 Mentioned: David Combs, Dairy Science Mentioned: Randy Shaver, Dairy Science Meeting In Three Lakes Highlights Need For Pollinators WXPR, 8/22 Mentioned: Department of Entomology International Agricultural Research Morning ...
Friday, August 26th, 2016
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extension-outreach
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CALS in the News for the Week of Aug 20 – Aug 26
Awards and honors

Paul Ahlquist named Steenbock Professor of Microbiological Sciences

Paul Ahlquist, professor of plant pathology, is one of two UW-Madison professors selected to receive 2016 Steenbock Professorships. The second recipient is James B. Rawlings, professor of chemical and biological engineering. Endowed more than 30 years ago by Evelyn Steenbock — wife of Harry Steenbock, an emeritus biochemistry professor — Steenbock Professorships provide a group of outstanding UW–Madison faculty with 10 years of financial support for their research programs. Paul G. Ahlquist, the new Steenbock Professor of Microbiological Sciences, joined the UW–Madison faculty in 1984 after earning his doctorate in Madison in 1981. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator since 1997, Ahlquist discovered that some viruses manipulate the membranes of cells they infect to protect virus replication from the destructive machinery of the cell. His laboratory now studies HIV and viruses that cause human cancers, hoping to identify steps in virus replication that present weak points and opportunities for treatment. Ahlquist, who has appointments in both oncology and plant pathology, is one of four lead scientists in the Morgridge Institute for Research, and has been a member of the National Academy of Sciences since 1991. Read the full ...
Wednesday, August 24th, 2016
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awards-nominations
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Paul Ahlquist named Steenbock Professor of Microbiological Sciences
Events

Water Sustainability and Climate Project stars in WPT documentary

The future of the Yahara Watershed takes center stage in a new documentary born of a partnership between the UW-Madison’s Water Sustainability and Climate project (WSC) and Wisconsin Public Television (WPT). Called “Yahara Watershed: A Place of Change,” the show will debut on Thursday, Sept. 1 at 7:30 p.m. on WPT. Nearly five-years in the making, the thirty-minute documentary features the research conducted by the WSC project team, which is studying the impacts of changes in climate and land-use on freshwater resources and other natural benefits in the Yahara Watershed. The show focuses on challenges related to the co-existence of agriculture and urban life in the region, as well as an innovative way of investigating what these challenges and their potential solutions could mean for the future of its water and people. “Having WPT integrated into our WSC project from the beginning has allowed us to showcase interdisciplinary research from a perspective that differs significantly from our traditional reporting of research in scientific journals,” says Christopher Kucharik, lead principal investigator for the WSC project and a professor of agronomy and environmental studies at ...
Wednesday, August 24th, 2016
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events-awards-honors
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Water Sustainability and Climate Project stars in WPT documentary